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dc.creatorParra, Mario Alfredo
dc.creatorBaez, Sandra Jimena
dc.creatorAllegri, Ricardo Francisco
dc.creatorNitrini, Ricardo
dc.creatorLopera Restrepo, Francisco Javier
dc.creatorSlachevsky, A
dc.creatorCustodio, Nilton
dc.creatorLira, David
dc.creatorPiguet, Olivier
dc.creatorKumfor, Fiona
dc.creatorHuepe, David
dc.creatorCogram, Patricia
dc.creatorBak, Thomas
dc.creatorManes, Facundo Francisco
dc.creatorIbanez, Agustin
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-22T13:55:13Z
dc.date.available2018-11-22T13:55:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-30
dc.identifier.issn00283878
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11323/1693
dc.description.abstractThe demographic structure of Latin American countries (LAC) is fast approaching that of developing countries, and the predicted prevalence of dementia in the former already exceeds the latter. Dementia has been declared a global challenge, yet regions around the world show differences in both the nature and magnitude of such a challenge. This article provides evidence and insights on barriers which, if overcome, would enable the harmonization of strategies to tackle the dementia challenge in LAC. First, we analyze the lack of available epidemiologic data, the need for standardizing clinical practice and improving physician training, and the existing barriers regarding resources, culture, and stigmas. We discuss how these are preventing timely care and research. Regarding specific health actions, most LAC have minimal mental health facilities and do not have specific mental health policies or budgets specific to dementia. In addition, local regulations may need to consider the regional context when developing treatment and prevention strategies. The support needed nationally and internationally to enable a smooth and timely transition of LAC to a position that integrates global strategies is highlighted. We focus on shared issues of poverty, cultural barriers, and socioeconomic vulnerability. We identify avenues for collaboration aimed to study unique populations, improve valid assessment methods, and generate opportunities for translational research, thus establishing a regional network. The issues identified here point to future specific actions aimed at tackling the dementia challenge in LAC.spa
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherNeurologyeng
dc.rightsAtribución – No comercial – Compartir igualeng
dc.subjectArgentinaeng
dc.subjectArticleeng
dc.subjectBrazileng
dc.subjectBudgeteng
dc.subjectCaribbeaneng
dc.subjectChileeng
dc.subjectClinical practiceeng
dc.subjectColombiaeng
dc.subjectCommunity careeng
dc.subjectConsensuseng
dc.subjectCubaeng
dc.subjectCultural factoreng
dc.subjectDementiaeng
dc.subjectEpidemiological monitoringeng
dc.subjectEvidence based practiceeng
dc.subjectHealth care accesseng
dc.subjectHealth care facilityeng
dc.subjectHealth care personneleng
dc.subjectHealth care policyeng
dc.subjectHealth care utilizationeng
dc.subjectHumaneng
dc.subjectIntersectoral collaborationeng
dc.subjectIntrospectioneng
dc.subjectlandscapeeng
dc.subjectMexicoeng
dc.subjectPerueng
dc.subjectPopulation researcheng
dc.subjectPovertyeng
dc.subjectPriority journaleng
dc.subjectProfessional standardeng
dc.subjectSocial statuseng
dc.subjectSocial stigmaeng
dc.subjectSouth and central Americaeng
dc.subjectStaff trainingeng
dc.subjectTime managementeng
dc.subjectTransitional careeng
dc.subjectTranslational researcheng
dc.titleDementia in Latin America assessing the present and envisioning the futureeng
dc.typeArticleeng
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