Show simple item record

dc.creatorTornero-Aguilera, Jose Grancisco
dc.creatorClemente Suárez, Vicente Javier
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-01T21:42:53Z
dc.date.available2019-04-01T21:42:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11323/2980
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Studies support the use of new training models based on low volume and high intensity in athletes, especially in soldier populations, showing greater physical improvements than conventional and classic approaches. We conducted this study to analyze the psychophysiological response of soldiers in two different high intensity interval training protocols (HIIT), resisted (RHIIT) and endurance (EHIIT), in order to determine which HIIT elicits a psychophysiological response similar to that in actual theaters of operation. METHODS: We recruited 21 professional soldiers from the Spanish Army. HIIT protocols were conducted in accordance with actual military scenarios, performed at 36–38°C. RESULTS: Both protocols, RHIIT and EHIIT, produced a significant increase in blood lactate (1.6 ± 0.3 to 6.4 ± 4.8 and 1.7 ± 0.6 to 11.2 ± 5.0, respectively), rate of perceived exertion, heart rate, and lower limb explosive strength; skin temperature and bodyweight presented significant decreases. Only EHIIT presented a significant increase on cortical arousal (35.9 ± 2.1 to 37.3 ± 2.8) and isometric hand-grip strength, achieving similar psychophysiological response as in previous simulated combat studies. DISCUSSION: Both endurance and resisted high interval intensity training protocols produced a significant increase in the psychophysiological response of soldiers. EHIIT presented more similarities with actual combat situations.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de la Costaes_ES
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/asma/amhp/2019/00000090/00000001/art00008;jsessionid=bgnmng73hna1k.x-ic-live-01es_ES
dc.rightsAtribución – No comercial – Compartir iguales_ES
dc.subjectcortical arousales_ES
dc.subjectinterval traininges_ES
dc.subjectHIITes_ES
dc.subjectpsychophysiological responsees_ES
dc.subjectsoldierses_ES
dc.titleResisted and Endurance High Intensity Interval Training for Combat Preparednesses_ES
dc.typePreprintes_ES
dcterms.references1. Armstrong LE, Maresh CM, Castellani J, Bergeron MF, Kenefick RW, et al. Urinary indices of hydration status. Int J Sport Nutr. 1994; 4(3):265–279. 2. Belinchon-deMiguel P, Clemente-Suárez VJ. Psycho-physiological, body composition, biomechanical and autonomic modulation analysis procedures in an ultraendurance mountain race. J Med Syst. 2018; 42(2):32. 3. Borg G. Perceived exertion as an indicator of somatic stress. Scand J Rehabil Med. 1970; 2(2):92–98. 4. Chalmers S, Esterman A, Eston R, Bowering KJ, Norton K. Short-term heat acclimation training improves physical performance: a systematic review, and exploration of physiological adaptations and application for team sports. Sports Med. 2014; 44(7):971–988. 5. Cheuvront SN, Kenefick RW. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects. Compr Physiol. 2014; 4(1):257–285. 6. Clemente VJ. Fatiga del sistema nervioso después de una prueba de contrarreloj de 30'en cicloergómetro en ciclistas jóvenes. Motricidad. Eur J Hum Mov. 2010; 25(1):197–206. 7. Clemente V, Huertas C, Juárez D. Nervous system fatigue flicker fusion thresholds after performing a test of maximal strength in squat. Revista de Entrenamiento Deportivo. 2011; 25(3):5–9. 8. Clemente V, Martínez A, Muñoz V, González JM. Fatigue of central nervous system after an incremental maximal oxygen uptake test. Archivos de Medicina del Deporte. 2010; 137:107–118. 9. Clemente-Suarez VJ. Periodized training archive better autonomic modulation and aerobic performance than non periodized training. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2018; 58(11):1559–1564. 10. Clemente-Suárez VJ, Arroyo-Toledo JJ. The Use of Autonomic Modulation Device to Control Training Performance after High-Intensity Interval Training Program. J Med Syst. 2018; 42(3):47. 11. Clemente-Suárez VJ, Diaz-Manzano M, Robles-Pérez JJ. Use of minicameras to improve operative procedure in security forces. J Med Syst. 2017; 41(9):130. 12. Clemente-Suárez VJ, Robles-Pérez JJ. Analysis of physiological markers, cortical activation and strength manifestations in a simulated combat. Archivos de Medicina del Deporte. 2012; 2012(149):594–600. 13. Clemente-Suárez VJ, Robles-Pérez JJ. Psycho-physiological response of soldiers in urban combat. Annee Psychol. 2013; 29(2):598–603. 14. Clemente-Suárez VJ, Robles-Pérez JJ, Montañez-Toledo P. 2015. Respuesta psicofisiológica en un salto táctico paracaidista a gran altitud. A propósito de un caso. Archivos de medicina del deporte. 2015; 167: 144–148. 15. Delgado-Moreno R, Robles-Pérez JJ, Aznar S, Clemente-Suarez VJ. Inalambric biofeedback devices to analyze strength manifestation in military population. J Med Syst. 2018; 42(4):60. 16. Delgado-Moreno R, Robles-Pérez JJ, Clemente-Suárez VJ. Combat stress decreases memory of warfighters in action. J Med Syst. 2017; 41(8):124. 17. Gaetano R, Rago V. Preliminary study on effects of hiit-high intensity intermittent training in youth soccer players. J Phys Educ Sport. 2014; 14(2):148–150. 18. Gibala MJ, Little JP, MacDonald MJ, Hawley JA. Physiological adaptations to low‐volume, high‐intensity interval training in health and disease. J Physiol. 2012; 590(5):1077–1084. 19. Gibala MJ, Little JP, Van Essen M, Wilkin GP, Burgomaster KA, et al. Short‐term sprint interval versus traditional endurance training: similar initial adaptations in human skeletal muscle and exercise performance. J Physiol. 2006; 575(Pt. 3):901–911. 20. Green JM, McLester JR, Crews TR, Wickwire PJ, Pritchett RC, Lomax RG. RPE association with lactate and heart rate during high-intensity interval cycling. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006; 38(1):167–172. 21. Helgerud J, Høydal K, Wang E, Karlsen T, Berg P, et al. Aerobic highintensity intervals improve VO2max more than moderate training. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007; 39(4):665–71. 22. Knapik JJ, Bullock SH, Toney E, Wells JD, Hoedebecke E, Jones BH. Influence of an injury reduction program on injury and fitness outcomes among soldiers. Inj Prev. 2004; 10(1):37–42. 23. Oja P, Tuxworth B, editors. Eurofit for adults: Assessment of healthrelated fitness. Strasborg, France: Council of Europe; 1995. 24. Sánchez-Molina J, Robles-Pérez JJ, Clemente-Suárez VJ. Respuesta fisiológica de una unidad paracaidista en combate urbanoArch Med Deporte. 2017; 34(3):66–70. 25. Serrano MA, Salvador A, González-Bono E, Sanchís C, Suay F. Relationships between recall of perceived exertion and blood lactate concentration in a judo competition. Percept Mot Skills. 2001; 92(3, Pt 2):1139–1148. 26. Terada S, Yokozeki T, Kawanaka K, Ogawa K, Higuchi M, et al. Effects of high-intensity swimming training on GLUT-4 and glucose transport activity in rat skeletal muscle. J Appl Physiol. 2001; 90(6):2019–2024. 27. Tornero-Aguilera JF, Clemente-Suarez VJ. Effect of experience, equipment and fire actions in psychophysiological response and memory of soldiers in actual underground operations. Int J Psychophysiol. 2018; 128:40–46. 28. Tornero-Aguilera JF, Clemente-Suárez V, Robles-Pérez J. Effect of combat stress in the psycho-physiological response of elite and non-elite soldiers. J Med Syst. 2017; 41(6):100. 29. Tornero-Aguilera JF, Robles-Pérez JJ, Clemente-Suárez VJ. Use of psychophysiological portable devices to analyze stress response in different experienced soldiers. J Med Syst. 2018; 42(4):75. 30. Washington Post News. (2017) Iranian city soars to record 129 degrees: Near hottest on Earth in modern measurements. [Accessed July 2018.] Available from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weathergang/wp/2017/06/29/iran-city-soars-to-record-of-129-degrees-nearhottest-ever-reliably-measured-on-earth/?utm_term5.20f5db68c610


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record